Research Article

Anesthesia treatment in cases of infant epiglottis cyst emergency extirpation operations

Published: June 17, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (2) : 4523-4528 DOI: 10.4238/2014.June.17.4

Abstract

Congenital epiglottic cyst is a rare embryonic disease. As a congenital laryngeal mucocele, its clinical manifestations include repeated sudden dyspneic respiration and even suffocation accompanied by laryngeal stridor after birth. During food intake, bucking and vomiting is a key feature. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of the disease affects growth and the development of neonatorum leading to suffocation and death. This study was designed to investigate the safety of anesthesia in infants with congenital epiglottic cyst during operation to reduce the occurrence of its complications. The treatment of operations on 12 infants with congenital epiglottic cysts were retrospectively analyzed. Twelve cases of infants with epiglottic cysts received emergency enucleation. Owing to adequate preanesthetic preparation, cystectomies were successfully performed with microwave cauterization under suspension laryngoscopy. None of the 12 patients showed apparent suffocation during anesthesia, the surgical results were good, and after 6 months to 1 year of follow-up, the disease had not recurred. Because of the acute onset of the disease and its severe symptoms and complications, attention should be paid to improve preoperative preparation. Careful selection of proper anesthesia is the key to achieving a successful operation.

Congenital epiglottic cyst is a rare embryonic disease. As a congenital laryngeal mucocele, its clinical manifestations include repeated sudden dyspneic respiration and even suffocation accompanied by laryngeal stridor after birth. During food intake, bucking and vomiting is a key feature. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of the disease affects growth and the development of neonatorum leading to suffocation and death. This study was designed to investigate the safety of anesthesia in infants with congenital epiglottic cyst during operation to reduce the occurrence of its complications. The treatment of operations on 12 infants with congenital epiglottic cysts were retrospectively analyzed. Twelve cases of infants with epiglottic cysts received emergency enucleation. Owing to adequate preanesthetic preparation, cystectomies were successfully performed with microwave cauterization under suspension laryngoscopy. None of the 12 patients showed apparent suffocation during anesthesia, the surgical results were good, and after 6 months to 1 year of follow-up, the disease had not recurred. Because of the acute onset of the disease and its severe symptoms and complications, attention should be paid to improve preoperative preparation. Careful selection of proper anesthesia is the key to achieving a successful operation.

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