Research Article

Antimutagenic and radioprotective activities of beta-carotene against the biological effects of iodine-131 radiopharmaceutical in Wistar rats

Published: March 31, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (1) : 2248-2258 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.March.31.5
Cite this Article:
(2014). Antimutagenic and radioprotective activities of beta-carotene against the biological effects of iodine-131 radiopharmaceutical in Wistar rats. Genet. Mol. Res. 13(1): gmr3167. https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.March.31.5
1,156 views

Abstract

Radioactive iodine-131 (131I) is used in the treatment and diagnosis of thyroid gland injuries. However, because it emits ionizing radiation, it causes harmful effects to cells. Given that beta-carotene (BC) has antioxidant and antigenotoxic properties, this study aimed to investigate its radioprotective and antimutagenic activity in relation to 131I at the dose that is used to treat hyperthyroidism using a test system of bone marrow cells from Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus). The doses were 0.2 mL of 8 mg BC/mL corn oil and 25 μCi 131I per 100 g body weight, and they were given via gavage in acute and subchronic treatments. Treatment groups included simultaneous, pre-treatment, post-treatment, and continuous treatment types. In all antimutagenic acute treatments, BC had a significant antimutagenic/radioprotective activity in relation to 131I. In subchronic antimutagenic treatments, BC reduced the damage that was caused by the radioisotope; however, this reduction was not statistically significant because of the relatively low percentage of chromosomal abnormalities that were observed with only 131I compared to the acute treatment. These results demonstrate the radioprotective and antimutagenic activity of BC, indicating its use by the population, which inevitably is exposed to mutagenic agents, as a means of health protection.

Radioactive iodine-131 (131I) is used in the treatment and diagnosis of thyroid gland injuries. However, because it emits ionizing radiation, it causes harmful effects to cells. Given that beta-carotene (BC) has antioxidant and antigenotoxic properties, this study aimed to investigate its radioprotective and antimutagenic activity in relation to 131I at the dose that is used to treat hyperthyroidism using a test system of bone marrow cells from Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus). The doses were 0.2 mL of 8 mg BC/mL corn oil and 25 μCi 131I per 100 g body weight, and they were given via gavage in acute and subchronic treatments. Treatment groups included simultaneous, pre-treatment, post-treatment, and continuous treatment types. In all antimutagenic acute treatments, BC had a significant antimutagenic/radioprotective activity in relation to 131I. In subchronic antimutagenic treatments, BC reduced the damage that was caused by the radioisotope; however, this reduction was not statistically significant because of the relatively low percentage of chromosomal abnormalities that were observed with only 131I compared to the acute treatment. These results demonstrate the radioprotective and antimutagenic activity of BC, indicating its use by the population, which inevitably is exposed to mutagenic agents, as a means of health protection.