Short Communication

Development of a DNA-based vaccine strategy against bovine papillomavirus infection, involving the E5 or L2 gene

Published: February 20, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (1) : 1121-1126 DOI: 10.4238/2014.February.20.13

Abstract

Papillomaviruses are known to cause tumor lesions, generally benign, in epithelial tissues of diverse organisms; these lesions may progress to cancer under suitable conditions. Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) can cause urinary bladder cancer and cancer of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, BPV1 and BPV2 are implicated in the development of tumors in equids. Many studies with animal models clearly demonstrate that DNA vaccines are very effective tools in controlling viral infections, providing strong humoral and cellular immune responses. In this study, we have described the development of two vaccine constructs for the control of diseases caused by BPV. The 1st strategy is prophylactic and is based on the L2 gene; the 2nd is therapeutic and is based on the E5 gene. Vaccine constructs were obtained and evaluated in vitro in mammalian cells. The results show the occurrence of E5 and L2 transcription and viral protein production. These results confirm the functionality of the vaccine constructs in mammalian cells. This is the 1st step in the development of a DNA-based vaccine strategy for the control and/or treatment of diseases caused by BPV.

Papillomaviruses are known to cause tumor lesions, generally benign, in epithelial tissues of diverse organisms; these lesions may progress to cancer under suitable conditions. Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) can cause urinary bladder cancer and cancer of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, BPV1 and BPV2 are implicated in the development of tumors in equids. Many studies with animal models clearly demonstrate that DNA vaccines are very effective tools in controlling viral infections, providing strong humoral and cellular immune responses. In this study, we have described the development of two vaccine constructs for the control of diseases caused by BPV. The 1st strategy is prophylactic and is based on the L2 gene; the 2nd is therapeutic and is based on the E5 gene. Vaccine constructs were obtained and evaluated in vitro in mammalian cells. The results show the occurrence of E5 and L2 transcription and viral protein production. These results confirm the functionality of the vaccine constructs in mammalian cells. This is the 1st step in the development of a DNA-based vaccine strategy for the control and/or treatment of diseases caused by BPV.