Research Article

Cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of fluoxetine hydrochloride (Prozac), with or without vitamins A and C, in plant and animal model systems

Published: January 28, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (1) : 578-589 DOI: 10.4238/2014.January.28.3

Abstract

Fluoxetine, commonly known as Prozac, is the first representative of the so-called new generation of antidepressants that promise efficacy, with few side effects, against deep depression, nervous bulimia, and anxiety. As there is a growing number of people suffering from anxiety and depression; consequently, the use of fluoxetine is also increasing. Verifying absence of drug effects such as cytotoxicity or mutagenicity is of great importance. Certain vitamins, such as vitamin A (retinol, retinoids) and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) protect and are extremely active against mutagens. We evaluated the cytotoxic and mutagenic activity of fluoxetine, with and without concomitant administration of vitamin A or C, in Allium cepa meristem cells and Wistar rat bone marrow cells. The A. cepa meristem cells showed fluoxetine cytotoxicity; concomitant treatment with vitamin A or C proved non-protective. Treatment of Wistar rats with fluoxetine intraperitoneally or via gavage did not affect cell division or cause clastogenic effects. Vitamin A and C did not affect the cytotoxicity or mutagenicity of fluoxetine in the rat cells.

Fluoxetine, commonly known as Prozac, is the first representative of the so-called new generation of antidepressants that promise efficacy, with few side effects, against deep depression, nervous bulimia, and anxiety. As there is a growing number of people suffering from anxiety and depression; consequently, the use of fluoxetine is also increasing. Verifying absence of drug effects such as cytotoxicity or mutagenicity is of great importance. Certain vitamins, such as vitamin A (retinol, retinoids) and vitamin C (ascorbic acid) protect and are extremely active against mutagens. We evaluated the cytotoxic and mutagenic activity of fluoxetine, with and without concomitant administration of vitamin A or C, in Allium cepa meristem cells and Wistar rat bone marrow cells. The A. cepa meristem cells showed fluoxetine cytotoxicity; concomitant treatment with vitamin A or C proved non-protective. Treatment of Wistar rats with fluoxetine intraperitoneally or via gavage did not affect cell division or cause clastogenic effects. Vitamin A and C did not affect the cytotoxicity or mutagenicity of fluoxetine in the rat cells.