Research Article

Clinical effects and safety of interventional therapy for parenchyma vascular malformation

Published: March 17, 2014
Genet. Mol. Res. 13 (1) : 1735-1743 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.January.22.13
Cite this Article:
(2014). Clinical effects and safety of interventional therapy for parenchyma vascular malformation. Genet. Mol. Res. 13(1): gmr3614. https://doi.org/10.4238/2014.January.22.13
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Abstract

Parenchyma vascular malformation (VM) is a common disease in modern society. Here, we investigated the clinical effects and safety of interventional therapy (IT) on the treatment of parenchyma VM. From January 1998 to December 2010, 31 patients with VM who elected IT were investigated, including 11 cases of venous VM and 20 cases of arteriovenous malformation. There were 19 males and 12 females, ranging from 12 to 51 years in age. VM often occurred in the four limbs and other areas, such as the trunk and reproductive organs. Under the guidance of digital subtraction angiography, vascular hardener was injected into the VM spot via percutaneous puncture. Then, embolotherapy was conducted via the transcatheter feeding artery. We found that, in all cases, the malformed vessels were completely or partially blocked. After treatment, the local swelling of vessels was alleviated and the diabrosis and bleeding ceased. The soft tissue lump shrank, then stiffened and became fixed. There was no occurrence of severe intraoperative or postoperative complications in any patient. In summary, IT is an effective method for treating parenchyma VM, causes only a minor operative wound, and should be viewed as the first choice intervention.

Parenchyma vascular malformation (VM) is a common disease in modern society. Here, we investigated the clinical effects and safety of interventional therapy (IT) on the treatment of parenchyma VM. From January 1998 to December 2010, 31 patients with VM who elected IT were investigated, including 11 cases of venous VM and 20 cases of arteriovenous malformation. There were 19 males and 12 females, ranging from 12 to 51 years in age. VM often occurred in the four limbs and other areas, such as the trunk and reproductive organs. Under the guidance of digital subtraction angiography, vascular hardener was injected into the VM spot via percutaneous puncture. Then, embolotherapy was conducted via the transcatheter feeding artery. We found that, in all cases, the malformed vessels were completely or partially blocked. After treatment, the local swelling of vessels was alleviated and the diabrosis and bleeding ceased. The soft tissue lump shrank, then stiffened and became fixed. There was no occurrence of severe intraoperative or postoperative complications in any patient. In summary, IT is an effective method for treating parenchyma VM, causes only a minor operative wound, and should be viewed as the first choice intervention.