Research Article

Incidence of acute mountain sickness in young adults at 3200 meters: comparison of the Lake Louise Scoring and Chinese Scoring Systems

Published: December 16, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (4) : 6790-6801 DOI: 10.4238/2013.December.16.5

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare two scoring systems used for the diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS): the Lake Louise Scoring (AMS-LLS) and the Chinese Scoring Systems (AMS-CSS). In total, 339 healthy young adult volunteers residing at sea level ascended to 3200 m by train and bus over a total journey time of 48 h. All subjects ascended in the same manner and were divided into three groups that were assessed after one (N = 88), two (N = 91), and three (N = 160) nights, respectively, at altitude. The overall incidence of AMS was 17.11% (N = 58) and 29.79% (N = 101) according to the AMS-LLS and AMS-CSS, respectively. Two participants (0.59%) experienced high-altitude pulmonary edema. Both scoring systems showed the highest incidence of AMS after the second night at high altitude. The AMS-CSS and AMS-LLS scores were significantly correlated (Pearson’s r = 0.820, P

The purpose of this study was to compare two scoring systems used for the diagnosis of acute mountain sickness (AMS): the Lake Louise Scoring (AMS-LLS) and the Chinese Scoring Systems (AMS-CSS). In total, 339 healthy young adult volunteers residing at sea level ascended to 3200 m by train and bus over a total journey time of 48 h. All subjects ascended in the same manner and were divided into three groups that were assessed after one (N = 88), two (N = 91), and three (N = 160) nights, respectively, at altitude. The overall incidence of AMS was 17.11% (N = 58) and 29.79% (N = 101) according to the AMS-LLS and AMS-CSS, respectively. Two participants (0.59%) experienced high-altitude pulmonary edema. Both scoring systems showed the highest incidence of AMS after the second night at high altitude. The AMS-CSS and AMS-LLS scores were significantly correlated (Pearson’s r = 0.820, P