Research Article

Mendelian inheritance, genetic linkage, and genotypic disequilibrium at nine microsatellite loci of Cariniana legalis (Mart.) O. Kuntze

Published: November 11, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (4) : 5442-5457 DOI: 10.4238/2013.November.11.6

Abstract

Cariniana legalis is one of the largest tropical trees with a wide distribution in the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest. We investigated the Mendelian inheritance, genetic linkage, and genotypic disequilibrium at seven microsatellite loci specifically isolated for C. legalis, and at two previously developed heterologous microsatellite loci. Forty to 100 open-pollinated seeds were collected from 22 seed-trees in two populations. Using the Bonferroni correction, no remarkable deviations from the expected Mendelian segregation, linkage, or genotypic disequilibrium were detected in the nine loci studied. Only 3.7% of the tests were significant for investigations of the Mendelian proportions. On the other hand, only 2.8% of tests for linkage detection showed significance. In addition, among all pairwise tests used for investigating linkage disequilibrium, significance was found in 9.7% of the locus pairs. Our results show clear evidence that the nine simple sequence repeat loci can be used without restriction in genetic diversity, mating system, and parentage analyses.

Cariniana legalis is one of the largest tropical trees with a wide distribution in the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest. We investigated the Mendelian inheritance, genetic linkage, and genotypic disequilibrium at seven microsatellite loci specifically isolated for C. legalis, and at two previously developed heterologous microsatellite loci. Forty to 100 open-pollinated seeds were collected from 22 seed-trees in two populations. Using the Bonferroni correction, no remarkable deviations from the expected Mendelian segregation, linkage, or genotypic disequilibrium were detected in the nine loci studied. Only 3.7% of the tests were significant for investigations of the Mendelian proportions. On the other hand, only 2.8% of tests for linkage detection showed significance. In addition, among all pairwise tests used for investigating linkage disequilibrium, significance was found in 9.7% of the locus pairs. Our results show clear evidence that the nine simple sequence repeat loci can be used without restriction in genetic diversity, mating system, and parentage analyses.