Research Article

Prognostic implication of molecular aberrations in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Published: November 11, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (4) : 5414-5423 DOI: 10.4238/2013.November.11.3

Abstract

Different molecular aberrations can be discriminated into certain prognostic subgroups in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients but their impact on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) remains controversial and studies from Asian populations are lacking. Forty-two adult non-M3 AML patients receiving allo-HSCT from 2002 to 2009 in southern Taiwan were retrospectively reviewed for survey, 23 (54.7%) of whom were CN-AML. NPM1, FLT3-ITD, and CEBPA were analyzed. After a median follow-up of 104 weeks (range, 8 to 384), patients in the good risk group (harboring either NPM1 or CEBPA mutation without concurrent FLT3-ITD) showed a borderline worse overall survival (OS) compared with the intermediate/poor risk group (P = 0.08). Interestingly, a poorer OS was found in patients with the CEBPA mutation (P = 0.003) but not the NPM1 mutation (P = 0.96). No OS difference was found between patients with or without FLT3-ITD (P = 0.15). In patients receiving allo-HSCT at first remission, there was no significant OS benefit in the good risk group (P = 0.33). In patients receiving allo-HSCT beyond first remission, disease status played a major role (P = 0.006), irrespective of molecular aberrations. Allo-HSCT in good risk patients should be carefully evaluated in Taiwanese, especially in patients with the CEBPA mutation. Conversely, allo-HSCT should be considered in first remission in patients with an intermediate/poor risk, where it may overcome the adverse impact of FLT3-ITD. Disease status remained a main issue in patients receiving allo-HSCT beyond first remission.

Different molecular aberrations can be discriminated into certain prognostic subgroups in cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) patients but their impact on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) remains controversial and studies from Asian populations are lacking. Forty-two adult non-M3 AML patients receiving allo-HSCT from 2002 to 2009 in southern Taiwan were retrospectively reviewed for survey, 23 (54.7%) of whom were CN-AML. NPM1, FLT3-ITD, and CEBPA were analyzed. After a median follow-up of 104 weeks (range, 8 to 384), patients in the good risk group (harboring either NPM1 or CEBPA mutation without concurrent FLT3-ITD) showed a borderline worse overall survival (OS) compared with the intermediate/poor risk group (P = 0.08). Interestingly, a poorer OS was found in patients with the CEBPA mutation (P = 0.003) but not the NPM1 mutation (P = 0.96). No OS difference was found between patients with or without FLT3-ITD (P = 0.15). In patients receiving allo-HSCT at first remission, there was no significant OS benefit in the good risk group (P = 0.33). In patients receiving allo-HSCT beyond first remission, disease status played a major role (P = 0.006), irrespective of molecular aberrations. Allo-HSCT in good risk patients should be carefully evaluated in Taiwanese, especially in patients with the CEBPA mutation. Conversely, allo-HSCT should be considered in first remission in patients with an intermediate/poor risk, where it may overcome the adverse impact of FLT3-ITD. Disease status remained a main issue in patients receiving allo-HSCT beyond first remission.