Research Article

Meta-analysis demonstrates lack of an association of microsomal epoxide hydrolase 1 polymorphisms with esophageal cancer risk

Published: October 15, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (4) : 4540-4548 DOI: 10.4238/2013.October.15.2

Abstract

Epoxide hydrolases metabolize exogenous chemicals, including carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The relationship between microsomal epoxide hydrolase 1 (EPHX1) polymorphisms and esophageal cancer risk has been investigated in various ethnic populations, but the results have been contradictory. We investigated the association of EPHX1 Tyr113His and His139Arg polymorphisms with esophageal cancer via a comprehensive meta-analysis. Publications before August 20, 2012 were included. Eight studies concerning Tyr113His polymorphism associated with 1158 esophageal cancer cases and 1868 controls were identified; 7 studies concerning association of His139Arg with 901 esophageal cancer cases and 1615 controls were also included. A random-effect model was applied, irrespective of between-study heterogeneity. Data and study quality were assessed in duplicate. No significant association was found in either the allele or genotype models for Tyr113His or His139Arg polymorphism with risk for esophageal cancer. Lack of association was also identified in stratified analyses by ethnicity. No publication bias was observed. We conclude that current evidence does not demonstrate association of EPHX1 Tyr113His or His139Arg polymorphisms with risk for development of esophageal cancer.

Epoxide hydrolases metabolize exogenous chemicals, including carcinogens such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The relationship between microsomal epoxide hydrolase 1 (EPHX1) polymorphisms and esophageal cancer risk has been investigated in various ethnic populations, but the results have been contradictory. We investigated the association of EPHX1 Tyr113His and His139Arg polymorphisms with esophageal cancer via a comprehensive meta-analysis. Publications before August 20, 2012 were included. Eight studies concerning Tyr113His polymorphism associated with 1158 esophageal cancer cases and 1868 controls were identified; 7 studies concerning association of His139Arg with 901 esophageal cancer cases and 1615 controls were also included. A random-effect model was applied, irrespective of between-study heterogeneity. Data and study quality were assessed in duplicate. No significant association was found in either the allele or genotype models for Tyr113His or His139Arg polymorphism with risk for esophageal cancer. Lack of association was also identified in stratified analyses by ethnicity. No publication bias was observed. We conclude that current evidence does not demonstrate association of EPHX1 Tyr113His or His139Arg polymorphisms with risk for development of esophageal cancer.

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