Research Article

Identification of a new locus conferring antixenosis to the brown planthopper in rice cultivar Swarnalata (Oryza sativa L.)

Published: August 29, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (3) : 3201-3211 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2013.August.29.4
1,025 views

Abstract

The brown planthopper [Nilaparvata lugens (Stål); BPH] has caused severe damage to rice production. The identification of resistance genes and the development of BPH-resistant varieties are economical and effective ways to manage this pest. Using an F2 population from a cross between the Indica cultivars 93-11 and Swarnalata, we mapped the Qbph-8 locus to a 7.3-cM region on chromosome 8 in two tests, flanked by the markers RM339 and RM515. In this population, Qbph-8 explained 7.7 and 6.6% of the phenotypic variance of BPH preference in both tests. In the BPH host choice test, the average number of settled BPHs on the Qbph-8 plants was less than that on the 93-11 plants over the 24- to 120-h observation period. Furthermore, less BPH insects were observed on the BPH6+Qbph-8 plant compared with the BPH6 plant or Qbph-8 plant, indicating a stronger antixenotic effect shown in the gene pyramiding plants. Hence, this locus can be pyramided with other BPH resistance genes and applied to breed-resistant varieties, which possibly can improve the resistance level and durable resistance to the BPH.

The brown planthopper [Nilaparvata lugens (Stål); BPH] has caused severe damage to rice production. The identification of resistance genes and the development of BPH-resistant varieties are economical and effective ways to manage this pest. Using an F2 population from a cross between the Indica cultivars 93-11 and Swarnalata, we mapped the Qbph-8 locus to a 7.3-cM region on chromosome 8 in two tests, flanked by the markers RM339 and RM515. In this population, Qbph-8 explained 7.7 and 6.6% of the phenotypic variance of BPH preference in both tests. In the BPH host choice test, the average number of settled BPHs on the Qbph-8 plants was less than that on the 93-11 plants over the 24- to 120-h observation period. Furthermore, less BPH insects were observed on the BPH6+Qbph-8 plant compared with the BPH6 plant or Qbph-8 plant, indicating a stronger antixenotic effect shown in the gene pyramiding plants. Hence, this locus can be pyramided with other BPH resistance genes and applied to breed-resistant varieties, which possibly can improve the resistance level and durable resistance to the BPH.

About the Authors