Research Article

A novel and efficient strategy for practical identification of tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) varieties using modified RAPD fingerprints

Published: June 11, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (2) : 1816-1828 DOI: 10.4238/2013.June.11.2

Abstract

Tomato breeding and variety development have led to the generation of a large number of varieties in many countries worldwide. This has created a growing and urgent need for an improved strategy for genotyping and identification since the traditional methods based on phenotype are growing unreliable. DNA markers could provide distinct benefits in tomato variety identification; however, DNA fingerprint analyses have not made DNA marker data readily usable for identification of varieties in tomato and other crops. A manual cultivar and/or variety identification diagram (MCID) strategy has been developed and has been found to make DNA markers more usable for the identification of genotyped plant individuals. We adopted this strategy, using modified RAPD markers to identify 42 tomato varieties from different geographical origins and seed merchants. All of the varieties were clearly separated and individually identified by reproducible fingerprints of only 6 RAPD primers. The tomato MCID that is generated is usable for the identification of any two or more tomato varieties. In addition, fewer primers can be used to make a distinction between varieties using this approach, since the selected fingerprints from each primer are used after they have been generated. The information in this first version of the tomato MCID can be enriched through identification and incorporation of more varieties and adaptation to other molecular markers in order to provide a more comprehensive tomato variety identification service for the horticultural industry.

Tomato breeding and variety development have led to the generation of a large number of varieties in many countries worldwide. This has created a growing and urgent need for an improved strategy for genotyping and identification since the traditional methods based on phenotype are growing unreliable. DNA markers could provide distinct benefits in tomato variety identification; however, DNA fingerprint analyses have not made DNA marker data readily usable for identification of varieties in tomato and other crops. A manual cultivar and/or variety identification diagram (MCID) strategy has been developed and has been found to make DNA markers more usable for the identification of genotyped plant individuals. We adopted this strategy, using modified RAPD markers to identify 42 tomato varieties from different geographical origins and seed merchants. All of the varieties were clearly separated and individually identified by reproducible fingerprints of only 6 RAPD primers. The tomato MCID that is generated is usable for the identification of any two or more tomato varieties. In addition, fewer primers can be used to make a distinction between varieties using this approach, since the selected fingerprints from each primer are used after they have been generated. The information in this first version of the tomato MCID can be enriched through identification and incorporation of more varieties and adaptation to other molecular markers in order to provide a more comprehensive tomato variety identification service for the horticultural industry.