Research Article

KLK1 A1789G gene polymorphism and the risk of coronary artery stenosis in the Chinese population

Published: May 14, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (2) : 1636-1645 DOI: 10.4238/2013.May.14.4

Abstract

Previous reports have shown that polymorphism of the human tissue kallikrein 1 (KLK1) A1789G gene is associated with susceptibility to hypertension. The current study aimed to confirm the association between the polymorphism in KLK1 and coronary artery stenosis (CAS). A total of 458 patients with CAS and 482 controls were used in a case-control study carried out between January 2008 and January 2011 at the Qilu Hospital (Jinan, China). Analyses of the KLK1 A1789G genotype were performed, and the logistic regression model was used to assess the odds ratio related to CAS. The results showed that the frequencies of the AA, AG, and GG genotypes were 11.4, 50.2, and 38.4%, respectively, in patients with CAS, and 21.2, 47.7, and 31.1%, respectively, in controls. Compared with the AA genotype, the GG and AG/GG genotypes were associated with a significantly increased risk of CAS. Furthermore, the AG and GG genotypes combined with smoking showed a remarkable increase in the risk for CAS. In conclusion, polymorphism of the KLK1 A1789G gene is associated with CAS, and smoking combined with the KLK1 GG genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of CAS. This information is extremely important to prevention strategies for CAS.

Previous reports have shown that polymorphism of the human tissue kallikrein 1 (KLK1) A1789G gene is associated with susceptibility to hypertension. The current study aimed to confirm the association between the polymorphism in KLK1 and coronary artery stenosis (CAS). A total of 458 patients with CAS and 482 controls were used in a case-control study carried out between January 2008 and January 2011 at the Qilu Hospital (Jinan, China). Analyses of the KLK1 A1789G genotype were performed, and the logistic regression model was used to assess the odds ratio related to CAS. The results showed that the frequencies of the AA, AG, and GG genotypes were 11.4, 50.2, and 38.4%, respectively, in patients with CAS, and 21.2, 47.7, and 31.1%, respectively, in controls. Compared with the AA genotype, the GG and AG/GG genotypes were associated with a significantly increased risk of CAS. Furthermore, the AG and GG genotypes combined with smoking showed a remarkable increase in the risk for CAS. In conclusion, polymorphism of the KLK1 A1789G gene is associated with CAS, and smoking combined with the KLK1 GG genotype was significantly associated with an increased risk of CAS. This information is extremely important to prevention strategies for CAS.

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