Research Article

Genetic variability in Blanco Orejinegro breed cattle populations in Colombia

Published: April 10, 2013
Genet. Mol. Res. 12 (2) : 1083-1094 DOI: 10.4238/2013.April.10.4

Abstract

We analyzed population structure and genetic diversity in Blanco Orejinegro Creole cattle with 12 microsatellite markers, genotyping 138 individuals belonging to 7 commercial and 3 conservation herds. These markers showed a high level of polymorphism; 171 alleles were identified. The mean number of alleles per locus was 5.63 (3.82-6.58). The total number of alleles per marker was 14.2 and ranged from 16 (TGLA126) to 22 (TGLA227). The mean expected heterozygosity (0.73) was higher than the observed heterozygosity (0.65), with a significant excess of heterozygosity in almost all populations (FIS = 0.09; P FST values obtained. We conclude that there is high allelic diversity in this breed, even though a low effective population size has been maintained and the level of inbreeding has not been monitored. Therefore, appropriate conservation efforts should be undertaken, such as adopting strategies aimed at minimizing inbreeding, to avoid losing genetic variability.

We analyzed population structure and genetic diversity in Blanco Orejinegro Creole cattle with 12 microsatellite markers, genotyping 138 individuals belonging to 7 commercial and 3 conservation herds. These markers showed a high level of polymorphism; 171 alleles were identified. The mean number of alleles per locus was 5.63 (3.82-6.58). The total number of alleles per marker was 14.2 and ranged from 16 (TGLA126) to 22 (TGLA227). The mean expected heterozygosity (0.73) was higher than the observed heterozygosity (0.65), with a significant excess of heterozygosity in almost all populations (FIS = 0.09; P FST values obtained. We conclude that there is high allelic diversity in this breed, even though a low effective population size has been maintained and the level of inbreeding has not been monitored. Therefore, appropriate conservation efforts should be undertaken, such as adopting strategies aimed at minimizing inbreeding, to avoid losing genetic variability.