Research Article

Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis of fat and muscle tissues in pigs

Published: September 26, 2012
Genet. Mol. Res. 11 (3) : 3505-3510 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2012.September.26.6
Cite this Article:
(2012). Methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism analysis of fat and muscle tissues in pigs. Genet. Mol. Res. 11(3): gmr1823. https://doi.org/10.4238/2012.September.26.6
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Abstract

DNA methylation may be involved in regulating the expression of protein-coding genes, resulting in different fat and muscle phenotypes. Using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism approach, we obtained 7423 bands by selective amplification of genomic DNA from six different fat depots and two heterogeneous muscle types from Duroc/Landrace/Yorkshire cross-bred pigs. The degrees of DNA methylation, determined by the percentages of hemi- and fully methylated sites relative to the total number of CCGG sites, were similar in male and female pigs for each specific tissue [χ2 test; P (two-tailed) > 0.05]. Gender bias was therefore ignored. There were significant differences in the degree of DNA methylation among the eight tissue types [χ2 test; Ptotal (two-tailed) = 0.009]. However, similar degrees of methylation were observed among the six fat depots [χ2 test; Pfat (two-tailed) = 0.24 > 0.05]and between the two muscle types [χ2 test; Pmuscle (two-tailed) = 0.76 > 0.05]. We conclude that the degree of DNA methylation differs between porcine fat and muscle tissue, but that the methylation status of a particular tissue type is similar, despite being deposited at different body sites.

DNA methylation may be involved in regulating the expression of protein-coding genes, resulting in different fat and muscle phenotypes. Using a methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism approach, we obtained 7423 bands by selective amplification of genomic DNA from six different fat depots and two heterogeneous muscle types from Duroc/Landrace/Yorkshire cross-bred pigs. The degrees of DNA methylation, determined by the percentages of hemi- and fully methylated sites relative to the total number of CCGG sites, were similar in male and female pigs for each specific tissue [χ2 test; P (two-tailed) > 0.05]. Gender bias was therefore ignored. There were significant differences in the degree of DNA methylation among the eight tissue types [χ2 test; Ptotal (two-tailed) = 0.009]. However, similar degrees of methylation were observed among the six fat depots [χ2 test; Pfat (two-tailed) = 0.24 > 0.05]and between the two muscle types [χ2 test; Pmuscle (two-tailed) = 0.76 > 0.05]. We conclude that the degree of DNA methylation differs between porcine fat and muscle tissue, but that the methylation status of a particular tissue type is similar, despite being deposited at different body sites.