Research Article

Selection pressures have driven population differentiation of domesticated and wild common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

Published: September 12, 2012
Genet. Mol. Res. 11 (3) : 3222-3235 DOI: 10.4238/2012.September.12.5

Abstract

Selection pressures are the principle evolutionary forces for the genetic differentiation of populations. Recent changes in selection pressures on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite have been described in a wide variety of organisms. The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) has experienced strong selection pressure, in particular artificial selection, during its domestication. However, the contribution and extent of artificial selection in driving genome-wide population differentiation remain unclear. We investigated the genetic differentiation of 4 domesticated strains (Xingguo red common carp, Glass red common carp, Purse red common carp, and Jian common carp, which have been generated by artificial selection since 1970s) and 2 wild populations (Shishou section in Hubei and Yangzhou section in Jiangsu of the Yangtze River) of common carp in China by sequencing the mitochondrial DNA D-loop and by genotyping 10 microsatellite loci. It was found that the domesticated strains exhibited linkage disequilibrium within the population and less genetic variability, higher inbreeding coefficients (FIS = 0.101 vs 0.038), and higher genetic differentiation (FST = 0.087 vs 0.001) than the wild populations, which indicates strong selection pressures in the process of domestication. Of the 10 loci, 5 appeared to be under positive directional selection in the domesticated strains, and all 10 loci in wild populations were potentially under balancing selection. We conclude that strong selection pressures, artificial selection in particular, have caused genetic differentiation between populations of domesticated and wild common carp.

Selection pressures are the principle evolutionary forces for the genetic differentiation of populations. Recent changes in selection pressures on mitochondrial DNA and microsatellite have been described in a wide variety of organisms. The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) has experienced strong selection pressure, in particular artificial selection, during its domestication. However, the contribution and extent of artificial selection in driving genome-wide population differentiation remain unclear. We investigated the genetic differentiation of 4 domesticated strains (Xingguo red common carp, Glass red common carp, Purse red common carp, and Jian common carp, which have been generated by artificial selection since 1970s) and 2 wild populations (Shishou section in Hubei and Yangzhou section in Jiangsu of the Yangtze River) of common carp in China by sequencing the mitochondrial DNA D-loop and by genotyping 10 microsatellite loci. It was found that the domesticated strains exhibited linkage disequilibrium within the population and less genetic variability, higher inbreeding coefficients (FIS = 0.101 vs 0.038), and higher genetic differentiation (FST = 0.087 vs 0.001) than the wild populations, which indicates strong selection pressures in the process of domestication. Of the 10 loci, 5 appeared to be under positive directional selection in the domesticated strains, and all 10 loci in wild populations were potentially under balancing selection. We conclude that strong selection pressures, artificial selection in particular, have caused genetic differentiation between populations of domesticated and wild common carp.