Research Article

Changes in inflorescence protein during advanced stages of floret development in Buchloe dactyloides (Poaceae)

Published: November 12, 2012
Genet. Mol. Res. 11 (4) : 3923-3932 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2012.August.17.5
Cite this Article:
(2012). Changes in inflorescence protein during advanced stages of floret development in Buchloe dactyloides (Poaceae). Genet. Mol. Res. 11(4): gmr1761. https://doi.org/10.4238/2012.August.17.5
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Abstract

Buffalograss, Buchloe dactyloides, is a dioecious species native to the Great Plains of North America. The florets at the early stages of development possess both gynoecium and androecium organ primordia but later become unisexual. Very little is known about the proteomic changes that occur when the florets change from hermaphroditism to unisexuality. We compared the protein composition of florets at the hermaphroditic stage with that at the unisexual stage. The development stage of the floret was determined by stereomicroscopic observation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to separate the proteins extracted from female and male inflorescences. Stage- specific protein maps, with an average of about 400 spots per map, were analyzed with the protein analysis software. Eighteen spots were found to be differentially expressed between the hermaphrodite and unisexual stages. Of these, 12 were present at both stages but with a different expression value. Four specific spots appeared at the hermaphrodite stage and disappeared at the unisexual stage. Two specific protein spots were associated with female and male floret differentiation. One appears to be associated with contabescence in the female floret and the final protein appears to lead to the abortion of gynoecium in the male floret. The MALDI TOF/TOF technique was used for peptide mass fingerprinting of the differentially expressed proteins and the MASCOT software was used to search the protein database. However, only two protein spots were identified from the database. These were aldolase1 and Os05g0574400 (similar to malate dehydrogenase). This type of proteomic study can help to identify novel protein products and determine the mechanisms involved in the floral sex differentiation process in buffalo grass.

Buffalograss, Buchloe dactyloides, is a dioecious species native to the Great Plains of North America. The florets at the early stages of development possess both gynoecium and androecium organ primordia but later become unisexual. Very little is known about the proteomic changes that occur when the florets change from hermaphroditism to unisexuality. We compared the protein composition of florets at the hermaphroditic stage with that at the unisexual stage. The development stage of the floret was determined by stereomicroscopic observation. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to separate the proteins extracted from female and male inflorescences. Stage- specific protein maps, with an average of about 400 spots per map, were analyzed with the protein analysis software. Eighteen spots were found to be differentially expressed between the hermaphrodite and unisexual stages. Of these, 12 were present at both stages but with a different expression value. Four specific spots appeared at the hermaphrodite stage and disappeared at the unisexual stage. Two specific protein spots were associated with female and male floret differentiation. One appears to be associated with contabescence in the female floret and the final protein appears to lead to the abortion of gynoecium in the male floret. The MALDI TOF/TOF technique was used for peptide mass fingerprinting of the differentially expressed proteins and the MASCOT software was used to search the protein database. However, only two protein spots were identified from the database. These were aldolase1 and Os05g0574400 (similar to malate dehydrogenase). This type of proteomic study can help to identify novel protein products and determine the mechanisms involved in the floral sex differentiation process in buffalo grass.