Research Article

Novel nonsense and frameshift NTRK1 gene mutations in Chinese patients with congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis

Published: August 13, 2012
Genet. Mol. Res. 11 (3) : 2156-2162 DOI: 10.4238/2012.May.18.8

Abstract

Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA; MIM 256800) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by absence of reaction to noxious stimuli, recurrent episodes of fever, anhidrosis, and mental retardation. It is caused by mutations in the gene coding for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (NTRK1; MIM# 191315). We screened two Chinese CIPA cases for mutations in the NTRK1 gene and examined their phenotype. Two novel mutations of the NTRK1 gene and two known mutations were identified. Including our two novel mutations, there are now 62 different NTRK1 gene mutations reported in patients with CIPA. We find that a combination of two null alleles usually leads to the severe phenotype, while the mild form of the CIPA disease is associated with at least one mild allele. Thirty-four among the 62 mutations (55%) are located within the tyrosine kinase domain of the NTRK1 protein. We concluded that the tyrosine kinase domain is a hot spot for mutations.

Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA; MIM 256800) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by absence of reaction to noxious stimuli, recurrent episodes of fever, anhidrosis, and mental retardation. It is caused by mutations in the gene coding for neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (NTRK1; MIM# 191315). We screened two Chinese CIPA cases for mutations in the NTRK1 gene and examined their phenotype. Two novel mutations of the NTRK1 gene and two known mutations were identified. Including our two novel mutations, there are now 62 different NTRK1 gene mutations reported in patients with CIPA. We find that a combination of two null alleles usually leads to the severe phenotype, while the mild form of the CIPA disease is associated with at least one mild allele. Thirty-four among the 62 mutations (55%) are located within the tyrosine kinase domain of the NTRK1 protein. We concluded that the tyrosine kinase domain is a hot spot for mutations.