Research Article

Identification of RNA editing sites in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) chloroplasts and editing events that affect secondary and three-dimensional protein structures

Published: April 19, 2012
Genet. Mol. Res. 11 (2) : 987-1001 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2012.April.19.4
Cite this Article:
(2012). Identification of RNA editing sites in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) chloroplasts and editing events that affect secondary and three-dimensional protein structures. Genet. Mol. Res. 11(2): gmr1486. https://doi.org/10.4238/2012.April.19.4
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Abstract

RNA editing can alter individual nucleotides in primary transcripts, which can cause the amino acids encoded by edited RNA to deviate from the ones predicted from the DNA template. We investigated RNA editing sites of protein-coding genes from the chloroplast genome of cotton. Fifty-four editing sites were identified in 27 transcripts, which is the highest editing frequency found until now in angiosperms. All these editing sites were C-to-U conversion, biased toward ndh genes and U_A context. Examining published editotypes in various angiosperms, we found that RNA editing mostly converts amino acid from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and restores evolutionary conserved amino acids. Using bioinformatics to analyze the effect of editing events on protein secondary and three-dimensional structures, we found that 21 editing sites can affect protein secondary structures and seven editing sites can alter three-dimensional protein structures. These results imply that 24 editing sites in cotton chloroplast transcripts may play an important role in their protein structures and functions.

RNA editing can alter individual nucleotides in primary transcripts, which can cause the amino acids encoded by edited RNA to deviate from the ones predicted from the DNA template. We investigated RNA editing sites of protein-coding genes from the chloroplast genome of cotton. Fifty-four editing sites were identified in 27 transcripts, which is the highest editing frequency found until now in angiosperms. All these editing sites were C-to-U conversion, biased toward ndh genes and U_A context. Examining published editotypes in various angiosperms, we found that RNA editing mostly converts amino acid from hydrophilic to hydrophobic and restores evolutionary conserved amino acids. Using bioinformatics to analyze the effect of editing events on protein secondary and three-dimensional structures, we found that 21 editing sites can affect protein secondary structures and seven editing sites can alter three-dimensional protein structures. These results imply that 24 editing sites in cotton chloroplast transcripts may play an important role in their protein structures and functions.