Research Article

Development of a species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region marker for roses

Published: February 24, 2012
Genet. Mol. Res. 11 (1) : 440-447 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2012.February.24.3
Cite this Article:
(2012). Development of a species-specific sequence-characterized amplified region marker for roses. Genet. Mol. Res. 11(1): gmr1592. https://doi.org/10.4238/2012.February.24.3
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Abstract

DNA fingerprints of four rose species, Rosa centifolia, R. Gruss-an-Teplitz, R. bourboniana, and R. damascena, were developed using RAPD-PCR. We identified a unique polymorphic band in R. centifolia. This 762-bp fragment was produced by the random primer GLI-2. The fragment was eluted and directly cloned in a TA cloning vector, pTZ57R/T. Digestion of the plasmid with EcoRI confirmed the cloning of GLI-2762 in pTZ57R/T. A second enzyme, PstI, used in combination with EcoRI, gave complete digestion of the plasmid, and the 762-bp fragment was confirmed on the gel. Subsequently, the polymorphic amplicon was sequenced with an AB1 373 DNA sequencer system using the PRISMTM Ready Reaction DyeDeoxyTM Terminator Cycle Sequencing kit. After sequencing, specific primers (23 bp long) were designed based on the sequence of the flanking regions of the original RAPD fragment. These primers will effectively allow fingerprinting for the identification of R. centifolia species. In essence, we developed an SCAR marker to authenticate the identity of R. centifolia species and to distinguish it from its substitutes. Such techniques are required not only to complement conventional parameters in creating the passport data of commercial and medicinal products of rose, but also for routine quality control in commercial and government rosaries and rose nurseries.

DNA fingerprints of four rose species, Rosa centifolia, R. Gruss-an-Teplitz, R. bourboniana, and R. damascena, were developed using RAPD-PCR. We identified a unique polymorphic band in R. centifolia. This 762-bp fragment was produced by the random primer GLI-2. The fragment was eluted and directly cloned in a TA cloning vector, pTZ57R/T. Digestion of the plasmid with EcoRI confirmed the cloning of GLI-2762 in pTZ57R/T. A second enzyme, PstI, used in combination with EcoRI, gave complete digestion of the plasmid, and the 762-bp fragment was confirmed on the gel. Subsequently, the polymorphic amplicon was sequenced with an AB1 373 DNA sequencer system using the PRISMTM Ready Reaction DyeDeoxyTM Terminator Cycle Sequencing kit. After sequencing, specific primers (23 bp long) were designed based on the sequence of the flanking regions of the original RAPD fragment. These primers will effectively allow fingerprinting for the identification of R. centifolia species. In essence, we developed an SCAR marker to authenticate the identity of R. centifolia species and to distinguish it from its substitutes. Such techniques are required not only to complement conventional parameters in creating the passport data of commercial and medicinal products of rose, but also for routine quality control in commercial and government rosaries and rose nurseries.