Research Article

Analysis of common MDR1 (ABCB1) gene C1236T and C3435T polymorphisms in Turkish patients with familial Mediterranean fever

Published: December 08, 2011
Genet. Mol. Res. 10 (4) : 3411-3420 DOI: 10.4238/2011.December.14.7

Abstract

The multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene encodes a P-glycoprotein that plays a key role in drug bioavailability and response to drugs in different human populations. More than 50 SNPs have been described for the MDR1 gene. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is considered an autosomal recessive hereditary disease, associated with a single gene named the Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV). However, about one-third of FMF patients have only one mutated allele, suggesting that this disease is expressed as an autosomal dominant trait with partial penetration or an additional gene might be responsible for the disease. We made genotype and haplotype analyses of the MDR1 gene in 142 FMF patients and 130 unrelated Turkish subjects; two MDR-1 genetic markers (C1236T and C3435T) were analyzed by PCR-RFLP analysis. FMF patients had a significantly higher frequency of the 3435 CT genotype compared with the control group (59.9% in FMF patients versus 44.6% in controls; odds ratio [OR] = 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14-3.00). Based on haplotype analysis, the T-C shift was significantly more frequent in controls (14.4% versus 7.1% in FMF patients). This haplotype could be protective for FMF disease (OR = 0.45; 95%CI = 0.25-0.84). The frequency of CC-CT (1236-3435) binary genotype was significantly higher in FMF patients (14.79% versus 4.61% in controls; OR = 3.59; 95%CI = 1.40-9.20).

The multidrug resistance (MDR1) gene encodes a P-glycoprotein that plays a key role in drug bioavailability and response to drugs in different human populations. More than 50 SNPs have been described for the MDR1 gene. Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is considered an autosomal recessive hereditary disease, associated with a single gene named the Mediterranean fever gene (MEFV). However, about one-third of FMF patients have only one mutated allele, suggesting that this disease is expressed as an autosomal dominant trait with partial penetration or an additional gene might be responsible for the disease. We made genotype and haplotype analyses of the MDR1 gene in 142 FMF patients and 130 unrelated Turkish subjects; two MDR-1 genetic markers (C1236T and C3435T) were analyzed by PCR-RFLP analysis. FMF patients had a significantly higher frequency of the 3435 CT genotype compared with the control group (59.9% in FMF patients versus 44.6% in controls; odds ratio [OR] = 1.85; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.14-3.00). Based on haplotype analysis, the T-C shift was significantly more frequent in controls (14.4% versus 7.1% in FMF patients). This haplotype could be protective for FMF disease (OR = 0.45; 95%CI = 0.25-0.84). The frequency of CC-CT (1236-3435) binary genotype was significantly higher in FMF patients (14.79% versus 4.61% in controls; OR = 3.59; 95%CI = 1.40-9.20).