Review

Functional characterization and signal transduction ability of nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat resistance genes in plants

Published: October 25, 2011
Genet. Mol. Res. 10 (4) : 2637-2652 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2011.October.25.10
Cite this Article:
(2011). Functional characterization and signal transduction ability of nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat resistance genes in plants. Genet. Mol. Res. 10(4): gmr1361. https://doi.org/10.4238/2011.October.25.10
1,065 views

Abstract

Pathogen infection in plants is often limited by a multifaceted defense response triggered by resistance genes. The most prevalent class of resistance proteins includes those that contain a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) domain. Over the past 15 years, more than 50 novel NBS-LRR class resistance genes have been isolated and characterized; they play a significant role in activating conserved defense-signaling networks. Recent molecular research on NBS-LRR resistance proteins and their signaling networks has the potential to broaden the use of resistance genes for disease control. Various transgenic approaches have been tested to broaden the disease resistance spectrum using NBS-LRR genes. This review highlights the recent progress in understanding the structure, function, signal transduction ability of NBS-LRR resistance genes in different host-pathogen systems and suggests new strategies for engineering pathogen resistance in crop plants.

Pathogen infection in plants is often limited by a multifaceted defense response triggered by resistance genes. The most prevalent class of resistance proteins includes those that contain a nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) domain. Over the past 15 years, more than 50 novel NBS-LRR class resistance genes have been isolated and characterized; they play a significant role in activating conserved defense-signaling networks. Recent molecular research on NBS-LRR resistance proteins and their signaling networks has the potential to broaden the use of resistance genes for disease control. Various transgenic approaches have been tested to broaden the disease resistance spectrum using NBS-LRR genes. This review highlights the recent progress in understanding the structure, function, signal transduction ability of NBS-LRR resistance genes in different host-pathogen systems and suggests new strategies for engineering pathogen resistance in crop plants.

About the Authors