Research Article

Sexing single bovine blastomeres using TSPY gene amplification

Published: October 25, 2011
Genet. Mol. Res. 10 (4) : 3937-3941 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/2011.October.25.1
Cite this Article:
(2011). Sexing single bovine blastomeres using TSPY gene amplification. Genet. Mol. Res. 10(4): gmr1568. https://doi.org/10.4238/2011.October.25.1
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Abstract

The testis-specific protein Y-encoded gene (TSPY) is a Y-specific gene present in variable copy number in many mammalian species, including cattle. We tested the applicability of the TSPY gene as a Y-specific marker to predict preimplantation embryo sex in Nelore (Bos indicus) cattle. Two blastomeres were removed from each embryo. A total of 36 single blastomeres and the remaining cells of their 18 matched in vitro conceived embryos were screened for TSPY amplification by nested-PCR. The results obtained from a single blastomere and the remaining cells of the same embryo were concordant in all cases. All blastomeres (16/16) from eight embryos produced with sexed sperm (specific for production of male embryos) were TSPY-positive. We conclude that TSPY is a good male-specific marker, the usefulness of which is probably enhanced by the high copy number. Other methods that are less time-consuming, such as real-time PCR, could be improved with the use of the TSPY gene sequences to generate primers and/or probes. This is the first report to demonstrate the applicability of the TSPY gene for sexing single cells in cattle.

The testis-specific protein Y-encoded gene (TSPY) is a Y-specific gene present in variable copy number in many mammalian species, including cattle. We tested the applicability of the TSPY gene as a Y-specific marker to predict preimplantation embryo sex in Nelore (Bos indicus) cattle. Two blastomeres were removed from each embryo. A total of 36 single blastomeres and the remaining cells of their 18 matched in vitro conceived embryos were screened for TSPY amplification by nested-PCR. The results obtained from a single blastomere and the remaining cells of the same embryo were concordant in all cases. All blastomeres (16/16) from eight embryos produced with sexed sperm (specific for production of male embryos) were TSPY-positive. We conclude that TSPY is a good male-specific marker, the usefulness of which is probably enhanced by the high copy number. Other methods that are less time-consuming, such as real-time PCR, could be improved with the use of the TSPY gene sequences to generate primers and/or probes. This is the first report to demonstrate the applicability of the TSPY gene for sexing single cells in cattle.