Research Article

Enzymatic differences between the endophyte Guignardia mangiferae (Botryosphaeriaceae) and the citrus pathogen G. citricarpa

Published: February 15, 2011
Genet. Mol. Res. 10 (1) : 243-252 DOI: https://doi.org/10.4238/vol10-1gmr952
Cite this Article:
(2011). Enzymatic differences between the endophyte Guignardia mangiferae (Botryosphaeriaceae) and the citrus pathogen G. citricarpa. Genet. Mol. Res. 10(1): gmr952. https://doi.org/10.4238/vol10-1gmr952
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Abstract

The endophyte Guignardia mangiferae is closely related to G. citricarpa, the causal agent of citrus black spot; for many years these species had been confused with each other. The development of molecular analytical methods has allowed differentiation of the pathogen G. citricarpa from the endophyte G. mangiferae, but the physiological traits associated with pathogenicity were not described. We examined genetic and enzymatic characteristics of Guignardia spp strains; G. citricarpa produces significantly greater amounts of amylases, endoglucanases and pectinases, compared to G. mangiferae, suggesting that these enzymes could be key in the development of citrus black spot. Principal component analysis revealed pectinase production as the main enzymatic characteristic that distinguishes these Guignardia species. We quantified the activities of pectin lyase, pectin methylesterase and endopolygalacturonase; G. citricarpa and G. mangiferae were found to have significantly different pectin lyase and endopolygalacturonase activities. The pathogen G. citricarpa is more effective in pectin degradation. We concluded that there are significant physiological differences between the species G. citricarpa and G. mangiferae that could be associated with differences in pathogenicity for citrus plants.

The endophyte Guignardia mangiferae is closely related to G. citricarpa, the causal agent of citrus black spot; for many years these species had been confused with each other. The development of molecular analytical methods has allowed differentiation of the pathogen G. citricarpa from the endophyte G. mangiferae, but the physiological traits associated with pathogenicity were not described. We examined genetic and enzymatic characteristics of Guignardia spp strains; G. citricarpa produces significantly greater amounts of amylases, endoglucanases and pectinases, compared to G. mangiferae, suggesting that these enzymes could be key in the development of citrus black spot. Principal component analysis revealed pectinase production as the main enzymatic characteristic that distinguishes these Guignardia species. We quantified the activities of pectin lyase, pectin methylesterase and endopolygalacturonase; G. citricarpa and G. mangiferae were found to have significantly different pectin lyase and endopolygalacturonase activities. The pathogen G. citricarpa is more effective in pectin degradation. We concluded that there are significant physiological differences between the species G. citricarpa and G. mangiferae that could be associated with differences in pathogenicity for citrus plants.